Wednesday, March 3, 2010

sap, worms, crows, snow


Northern Native American tribes knew this moon as the Full Crow Moon when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter. They also used Full Crust Moon because the snow cover became crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Dakota Sioux named it Moon When Eyes Are Sore From Bright Snow. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees is a Colonial variation. It was considered to be the last full moon of winter.
– Old Farmer’s Almanac

Good things. The pea sprouts are up. Undies are on the line. The camelia and tulip trees are in bloom. My desk drawer is full of freshly sharpened pencils and smooth-flowing pens. The air smells like a pinkie promise. This poem by KJ Hays is delicious. And Tuesday, March 10 is the full Worm Moon.


Last Full Moon of Winter

When eyes are sore from bright snow
I crawl beneath the thick hide of you,
relax aching fingertips against
the soft warmth of naked hip and pelvis,
calf and thigh, press my lips into the muscled
curve of your shoulder. Skin against
skin cracks the bitterness of cold and ice
freeing petals from clench-fisted buds.
When Eyes Are Sore From Bright Snow Moon rises.
Sap Moon sets. Worm Moon wanes. Crow moon calls.
Winter is done.

4 comments:

Craig Sorensen said...

Skin against
skin cracks the bitterness of cold and ice
freeing petals from clench-fisted buds.


Oh yeah.

Spring still seems a long way off here, but I can wait...

Jeremy Edwards said...

The air smells like a pinkie promise.

I want you to be my meteorologist!!

Gina Marie said...

Hi Craig! Spring, summer, they're always worth the wait, yes? What I wonder is, if there was no winter, would the balmy seasons be as thrilling? Cuz sometimes I REALLY want to run away to a hot place with hammocks.

Jeremy, I'll predict your weather any ol' time. I'm always right when I'm not wrong!

Shanna Germain said...

Woo-woo! I see you!!!!

http://www.cleansheets.com/fiction/marie_03.03.10.shtml

:P