Friday, June 6, 2008

Snicker My Doodle


I realize June in the Pacific Northwest is supposed to be a little damp. But it's not just damp. It's cold. So flipping cold! I want to spend the entire day in a hot bath and drink gallons of tea. English tea. In little cups. Build a fire. Stoke the fire! One of my favorite annual treats just arrived in the mail box. No, it doesn't require batteries. It's the Summer Fiction edition of the New Yorker Magazine. But it seems so wrong to read it while drinking hot tea. I should be sitting in my Adirondack chair in the herb garden drinking a nice light pinot gris. The air should be light and comfortable on my skin. This whole scene is just wrong!!! So....my plan is to heat up the oven to 5,000 degrees and cook stuff. Lots of fluffy, rich, cakey stuff. Platters of thick, bloody, meaty stuff.

I'm starting with Snickerdoodles. I came across the sexiest Snickerdoodle recipe ever today (plus, it's just really fun to say snick-er-doo-del over and over again. And any recipe that contains the phrase: "Creaming ensures the best spread and rise" deserves my attention.


Snickerdoodles
Cook's Country

Helpful tips:



  • Blend butter and vegetable shortening for the best spread and the signature crinkly-topped appearance.

  • Use the creaming method to mix the dough: Beat the fats and sugar together until light and fluffy before adding the liquid ingredients, and finally, the dry ingredients. Creaming ensures the best spread and rise. (Mmmm hmmm)!

  • Make sure the butter is soft enough before creaming. Cold butter won’t mix nearly as well with the sugar and, consequently, the cookies will turn out flat.

  • Bake the cookies one sheet at a time to ensure perfectly even baking.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies


With their crinkly tops and liberal dusting of cinnamon sugar, these chewy cookies are a New England favorite.

Ingredients:
1 3/4 cups sugar
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon table salt
8 tablespoons unsalted butter (1 stick), softened
1/2 cup vegetable shortening
2 large eggs

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